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Federal data shows that more and more people are dying in large truck crashes in New Jersey and across the U.S. In 2017, a total of 4,102 people died in such accidents, marking a 28 percent increase from 2009. Rear-end collisions are among the most common types of accidents between large trucks and passenger vehicles, and they can also be among the most devastating.

This is why truck safety groups are advocating for a federal guideline that would require all heavy trucks to have forward collision warning and mitigation technology. The National Transportation Safety Board has made such a recommendation on at least 10 occasions since the 1990s to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, but the latter has yet to propose any regulations. This has led to criticism of the NHTSA.

The NHTSA has issued a written statement saying that it is still studying the technology behind forward collision warning systems. It is also conducting tests for next-generation automatic emergency braking.

Critics are concerned that the trucking industry is far behind the automobile industry when it comes to technological advancements. After all, freight shipments by truck are rising. AEB and forward crash warning systems are expected to be standard for all new vehicles sold in the U.S. by 2022.

Someone who has been injured in a truck accident through little to no fault of their own may have good grounds for a claim. If successful, their claim could reimburse them for medical expenses, vehicle damage, lost wages and whatever else applies. The at-fault trucking company may or may not be willing to negotiate a settlement. In either case, the victim might want to hire a lawyer for assistance with the claims process.